WWUH RADIO HISTORY
1970 Text
This section is under construction and should be considered in draft form.  Your input is invited.  If you want to add material, make suggestions, correct the record, etc, please email us at wwuh@hartford.edu.  And if you have photos to share of your time at WWUH please let us know that as well.  While we strive to present information that is as accurate as possible please consider the information below for entertainment purposes only.

          With Clark Smidt graduating in May, the students at WWUH held elections for a new Executive Committee (ECOM) on April 15 with the following results: General Manager: Ken Kalish, Station Manager: William Crepeau, Claude G. Schleuderer - Program Director: Charles Horwitz, Business Manager: Philip Cabot, Chief Engineer: Charles Allen, Members-at-large: John Eppler and Charles Prunier, Music Director: Stuart Kaufman

          In April, Stuart Kaufman stepped down as Music Director and Ann Harte took over the demanding job.

         

          The station’s first Marathon started at 9:00  p.m. on March 20 and ran for ten days with a goal of $2000.  $2040 was received in pledges.

 

          WWUH carried all of the UH basketball games, including the annual court duel from Trinity College. 

          According to a station press release “The Hartford area will be flooded shortly with 3,000 ‘black-light, day-glo’ automobile bumper stickers, emblazoned on a black backround, in red and orange will  be the legend WWUH-FM,91.3 STEREO LISTEN AHEAD”.   

         

          There was much discussion about subscribing to an audio news service such as Mutual Network News.  Mutual was available for free, but the station would have to pay for the line charges.  The ECOM decided that if network news were to be carried, it would be scheduled so as not to interrupt Classical programming, or it would be run after midnight.  Also, UPI would be dropped.  The staff was evenly divided about whether carrying some type of national network news would fit in with the station’s philosophy of airing local programming.  Some thought that it was contrary to this philosophy, while others thought it added quite a bit of professionalism to the station’s sound, and provided the listeners with important information.

 

          The 1970/71 budget, discussed at an ECOM meeting in April, included discussions on whether the station should purchase a toll-free WATTS line, Network News, an Ampex reel-to-reel recorder and back issues of records that the library desperately needed.  The group also made plans to move the station’s transmitter to Avon Mountain, to a space provided by WTIC.  The engineering department also began construction on tape delays and speakerphones to facilitate putting phone calls from listeners on the air. Later that year, $5,000 of the Roth Grant money would be appropriated for an audio console for the FM studio, completion of the production board, and an EBS monitor.

 

          In addition to operating the FM station, the staff continued to run WWUH-AM, which operated legally without an FCC license by broadcasting through the wiring in the dorms.   Because WWUH-AM did not need a license, there were no restrictions as to the airing of commercials, and WWUH-AM started selling airtime to businesses that wanted to reach the student population.   They money raised was to be used to help fund the FM station.   A commission schedule was finalized by the ECOM where 15% went to sales people (with no other reimbursement for expenses), 5% for Sales Manager (limited to 10% if he sells the ad) and 2% for the Business Manager.

         

          An ECOM meeting in May 1970, centered on censorship and the responsibility of the station’s management versus the University as licensee. Staff members had aired “A Night at Santa Rita,” which contained several obscene words and had be previously prohibited by an ECOM vote for airplay.  The record was eventually taken off the air in its second side of play, but an on-air discussion about censorship followed.

 

          As a result, the ECOM pulled several questionable records from the library because of the sensibilities of both the audience and the university’s administration.  Caught between the concepts of providing first class, professional sounding programming and embracing the first amendment to its fullest, the ECOM felt secure in its decision as long as the University held the station’s license.

         

          Changes were made to the WWUH Constitution in 1970 to allow the station to receive funds from the Student Association, to allow for absentee ballots, and to provide for voting by proxy.

 

          The ECOM was wary of its association with the Student Association as the SA had shown that they clearly didn’t understand what was involved with running an FCC licensed FM broadcast station.  ECOM finally determined that the SA could audit the station’s financial records and could run the AM station, but they would have no control over the FM station. While the association with the SA was a positive thing, it also prevented community volunteers from having a direct voice in elections and other policy votes.

 

          At this time, all on-air personnel needed to have a third class FCC with Broadcast Endorsement license if they were alone in the studio. The station held training sessions for this license quarterly, and students organized car pools to Boston and New York City for the exams. 

 

          Programming on WWUH-AM included the live broadcast of Student Association meetings (at the request of the S.A.) and football games from the athletic field.

 

Historically in1969: Communist China exploded its first hydrogen bomb (June 17); the US and USSR proposed a nuclear nonproliferation treaty.  racial violence in Detroit; 7,000 National Guardsmen aid police after night of rioting. Similar outbreaks in New York City's Spanish Harlem, Rochester, N.Y., Birmingham, Ala., and New Britain, Conn. (July 23); Thurgood Marshall sworn in as first black US Supreme Court justice (Oct. 2); Astronauts Col. Virgil I. Grissom, Col. Edward White II, and Lt. Cmdr. Roger B. Chaffee killed in fire during test launch (Jan. 27).

 

Spring 1970

 

          With station founder Clark Smidt graduating in May, the students at WWUH held elections for a new Executive Committee (ECOM) on April 15. Ken Kalish was elected General Manager, William Crepeau – Station Manager, Charles Horwitz – Program Director, Philip Cabot – Business Manager, Charles Allen – Chief Engineer, and John Eppler and Charles Prunier – members-at-large.  In April, Stuart Kaufman stepped down as Music Director and Ann Harte took over the demanding job.

 

          Partial Staff List:  Charles Allen, Philip Cabot, Tom Canaday, William Crepeau, John Eppler,  Charlie Horwitz, Ken Kalish, Stuart Kaufman, Brian Lord, Charles Prunier

         

          There was much discussion about subscribing to an audio news service such as Mutual Network News.  Mutual was available for free, but the station would have to pay for the line charges.  The ECOM decided that if network news were to be carried, it would be scheduled so as not to interrupt Classical programming, or it would be run after midnight.  Also, UPI would be dropped.  The staff was evenly divided about whether carrying some type of national network news would fit in with the station’s philosophy of airing local programming.  Some thought that it was contrary to this philosophy, while other thought it added quite a bit of professionalism to the station’s sound, and provided the listeners with important information.

 

          March saw a ten-day, 240 hour broadcast marathon which raised $1300 for summer fill-ins. Program Director Charles Horwitz was quoted in a press release: “We are offering something for everyone.  We are the only college station operating this summer in the Greater Hartford area. We are portable for beach parties and surf-side rituals”.  The Release goes on to say that Monday through Friday WWUH signs on at 9 an and goes to bed at 4 am.  On Saturday the schedule runs from 10 am to 4 am and on Sunday the broadcast day is from 10 am to 2 am.  New features in 1970 include newscasts almost ever hour on the hour with the help of WWUH’s affiliation with the Mutual Broadasting System. Summer features include “Poppy Fields,” a weekday 10 am folk-rock program, “Soul Sensation” at 8pm on Friday with Maceo Woods and “American Legacy Bonanza” three hours of folk music with Brian Lord.  Weekdays at 5 pm WWUH airs three hours of Classical Music with the following hosts:  Tibor Banlaki, Charles Horwitz, Sherman Novoson and Louis Gagnon. 

 

          The 1970/71 budget, discussed at an ECOM meeting in April, included discussions on whether the station should purchase a toll-free WATTS line, Network News, an Ampex reel-to-reel recorder and back issues of records that the library desperately needed.  The group also made plans to move the station’s transmitter to Avon Mountain, to a space provided WTIC.  The engineering department also began construction on tape delays and speakerphones to facilitate putting phone calls from listeners on the air. Later that year, $5,000 of the Roth Grant money would be appropriated for an audio console for the FM studio, completion of the production board, and an EBS monitor.

 

          In addition to operating the FM station, the staff continued to run WWUH-AM, which operated without an FCC license by broadcasting through the wiring in the dorms.   Because WWUH-AM did not need a license, there were no restrictions as to the airing of commercials, and WWUH-AM started selling airtime to businesses that wanted to reach the student population.   They money raised was to be used to help fund the FM station.   A commission schedule was finalized by the ECOM where 15% went to sales people (with no other reimbursement for expenses), 5% for Sales Manager (limited to 10% if he sells the ad), 2% for the business Manager and 1% for the traffic director who scheduled the spots.  The station simulcast its programming on both FM and AM, and while a PSA ran on the FM a spot would run on the AM.

 

          An April press release described the station programming this way. “WWUH is now on the air from 2p.m. to 2 a.m. on weekdays, and from 10 a.m. to 3 a.m. on weekends.  In general, programming involves “easy listening” in the afternoon, classical programs in the early evening and college-oriented music until sign-off.

          “John Labella announces the “easy listening” hours which includes the music of Laura Nyro, Joni Mitchell and The Moody Blues.

          “A special feature on Friday at 5 p.m. is a folk music program directed by Brian Lord, a Navy veteran who hails from N.J.  Lord, a liberal arts student, has evoked widespread interest with his droll, offbeat comments.”

         

         

          An ECOM meeting in May 1970, centered on censorship and the responsibility of the station’s management versus the University as licensee. Staff members had aired “A Night at Santa Rita,” which contained several obscene words and had be previously prohibited by ECOM vote for airplay.  The record was eventually taken off the air in its second side of play, but an on-air discussion about censorship followed.

 

          As a result, the ECOM pulled several questionable records from the library because of the sensibilities of both the audience and the university’s administration.  Caught between the concepts of providing first class, professional sounding programming and embracing the first amendment to its fullest, the ECOM felt secure in its decision as long as the University held the station’s license.

         

          Changes were made to the WWUH Constitution in 1970 to allow the station to receive funds from the Student Association, to allow for absentee ballots, and to provide for voting by proxy.

 

          The ECOM was wary of its association with the Student Association as the SA had shown that they clearly didn’t understand what was involved with running an FCC licensed FM broadcast station.  If was finally determined that the SA could audit the station’s financial records and could run the AM station, but they would have no control over the FM station. While the association with the SA was a positive thing, it also prevented community volunteers from a direct voice in elections and other policy votes.

 

          At this time, all on-air personnel needed to have a third class FCC with Broadcast Endorsement license if they were alone in the studio. The station held training sessions for this license quarterly, and students organized car pools to FCC offices in Boston and New York City for the exams. 

 

          Programming on WWUH-AM included the live broadcast of Student Association meetings (at the request of the S.A.) and UH football games from the athletic field.

Charlie Horwitz wrote:

      “The time were right; agricultural products were in bountiful supply and quality was high and there was just enough air talent left over from the school year for Ken Kalish (bless his little pea-picking heart) to give me permission to keep  Mother (the UH transmitter) up past her bed time. This was summer of '70 I think. The goal was to do midnight to 3am, 7 days a week and in some small way, compete with 'HCN. and the other underground sounds out there. Thought on Friday and Saturday nights, we saw no reason to stop before the sun came up. Ain't nothing like programming music for a sunrise (or sunset for that matter).
            There were times when fun became drudgery and even pharmaceutical enhancement did help much to keep us going. But once the fall semester started, we had a whole new crop of talent, willing to do all nighters just for the privilege of doing a shift and play that evil rock and roll music. Funny how no one ever asked to do all night classics, folk or soul programming.
            Well that's my story and I'm sticking to it.”
 
            Michael Ditkoff reminisced in 2006:

 

            “I remember one year, the station's exec committee went to the CBA's spring convention, conference, whatever in Groton, CT. The conference included a trip to General Boat or General Dynamics shipyard for the launching of the submarine Batfin. Senator Lowell Weicker, gave the keynote address. The conference was helpful for smoozing. Jon Eppler drove his car, a former Connecticut state police car, to the conference. I remember we stopped after a toll so we could ensure nobody got lost. He said through the car's loud speaker "Get back in the car, Mike." In April or May 1972, several station members attended the NAB (National Association of Broadcasters) convention in Washington, DC. Sometime during the smoozing, GM Phil approached the President, GM, whatever of WTIC, Leonard Patricelli, and asked if we could put attach our antenna to the WTIC weather tower. This is how we got permission. The gang of us stayed at the Windsor Park hotel, which today is the Chinese embassy. For a few minutes, I got to interview FCC Commissioner Nicholas Johnson, who was considered a rebel commissioner and took the license renewal procedure very seriously and encouraged public comment on renewals. He wrote the book How to talk back to your television set.”  

 

 

Fall 1970

 

          In October of 1970, Brian Lord was voted in as Program Director at a special election, and discussion about whether to have a monthly Program Guide continued. One issue could be produced for $70, which included 1,000 copies but no photographs, and the staff would have to do the formatting and typing. It was hoped that the cost would be underwritten by selling ads in the guide.

         

          In November Anne Harte, formally student personnel director of WWUH, was named black affairs director as as such she was in charge of coordinating “all black programming, as well as public affairs programs which have to do with the black community.” (Quote from at Nov. ’70 station press release).

 

          In December of 1970, the ECOM decided that the AM station could find personnel from outside of the student population. Plans were discussed to install 150 feet of Christmas lights and a peace symbol on the WWUH tower on Gengras for the holiday season.

 

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT:

 

          The station spent $4,000 for two Scully 280B 1/2 track reel-to-reel machines for use in production. This was nearly one-third of the station’s total budget, but it was justified since these machines would allow the station to greatly expand its production department and facilitate the broadcast of pre-recorded concerts.  These state-of-the-art machines, the "pride" of the station, remained in use until 1989.

 

          Audio processing at this date consisted of a CBS Labs Audimax and Volumax.  The transmitter was controlled by a custom extension-metering panel, on the over bridge above the air console.  This panel was designed and built by station engineers and allowed all applicable transmitter readings to be taken while in the on-air studio, and allowed for filament and plate on/off switching and power adjustment.

 

          The air studio equipment consisted of a 5-channel Sparta console, QRK turntables with Microtrack arms, two Spotmaster stereo cart decks and two Ampex 354 reel-to-reel machines.  The announcer spoke into two AKG D-200 microphones connected for stereo, which meant that the listener would hear the announcers voice moving between their speakers as the DJ turned to one side or another while speaking.

 

          WWUH-AM utilized transmitters in each of the five dorms.  The WWUH AM studio was the small "booth" next to the air studio.

 

Major News Stories in 1970:

          US troops invade Cambodia (May 1). Background: Vietnam War; four students at Kent State University in Ohio slain by National Guardsmen at demonstration protesting incursion into Cambodia (May 4).

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