WWUH RADIO HISTORY
1972 Text
This section is under construction and should be considered in draft form.  Your input is invited.  If you want to add material, make suggestions, correct the record, etc, please email us at wwuh@hartford.edu.  And if you have photos to share of your time at WWUH please let us know that as well.  While we strive to present information that is as accurate as possible please consider the information below for entertainment purposes only.

Spring 1972

          Philip Cabot was elected General Manager in March.  Also elected were:  Robert Weitz – Station Manager, Thomas Cadaday – Program Director, Charles Allen – Chief Engineer, Michael Ditkoff -  Business Manager, Anne Harte – At Large Member, David Radka, At Large Member.

          Staff (partial): Charles Allen, Tricia Beatty, Phil Cabot, Tom Canady, Michael Ditkoff, Anne Harte, Alex Leslie, Dawn Magi, Mel Peppers, Dave Radka, Roger Stauss, Robert Weitz.  Faculty Advisors: Dr. Ummuna, Ed Nelson and Louis Sampliner.

          WWUH, in a testament to the professionalism of the staff and programming, was invited to “move Mother to the Mountain.” Raising the height of the antenna to almost 500 feet above average terrain and moving it to Avon Mountain increased the station’s reliable coverage from five miles to nearly 20 miles.  Charles Allen, Chief Engineer, did all of the leg work in preparing the transmitter to move to the mountain, but was unable to finish the project due to a work conflict.  The project was passed to engineer, Larry Titus, who, along with Stu Yeager and Steve Shore, presided over the actual move.


 

          The station raised money for the move in its first fund-raising marathon that spring.  The two-week Marathon raised  $7,200.  This move was a major step for the station, and it necessitated the purchase of a new antenna.  It was also was the first time the station had to pay for the transmitter's electricity, which, at about $100 per month, was a significant budget line item. 

 

          To help fund the move Alex Leslie put together the first Program Guide which was published in April to help raise funds and reward those who had donated to the station.

 

          Station management had their hands full running the FM side of the station so a decision was made to concentrate on the FM and allow the AM to fall by the wayside.  While the intent was to operate the AM station as a training ground for students interested in getting on the FM, running two stations had become just too much work, and everyone wanted to be on the FM so that they could broadcast to the whole community.    

The Student Association donated $2,000 to enlarge the station’s record library. 

 

Election of officers on February 29, 1972: General Manager: Phil Cabot, Station Manager: Robert Weitz, Program Director: Tom Canady, Business Manager: Michael Ditkoff, Chief Engineer: Charles Allen, Members-at-large: Anne Harte and Dave Radka.  Faculty Advisors: Dr. Ummuna and Ed Nelson

 

Staff (partial): Charles Allen, Marc Andrews, Art Barlow, Joe Barone, Tricia Beatty, Phil Cabot, Tom Canady, Bob Carlin, Michael Ditkoff, Bob Dunkley, Pete Godoff, Anne Harte, Patrick Hill, Mike Joseph, Bob Katz, Dawn Magi, Timm Muldoon, Nel, Mel Peppers, Mark Persky, Bud Pyatak, Dave Radka, Cliff Scheley, Jim Shanahan, Bonnie Sinclair, Bob Smolen, Joe Soya, Roger Stauss, Leslie Terry, Joe Terzo, Ifekandu Umunna, Uncle Dave, Bob Walker, Robert Weitz, Maceo Woods, Joe Young,   

 

          The station’s first Marathon was planned for midnight April 7 to midnight April 23.  Donors received a subscription to the Program Guide for a $5 donation. Announcers were asked to mention the Marathon once every 15 minutes during the 16-day event.  The goal was set at $7,200, earmarked for the transmitter move.  Hourly totals were posted on a blackboard.

 

          A Black Coalition, formed within the radio station, demanded more black programs on the air.  Their concern was that soul and jazz were being neglected, and that there were not enough albums.  A separate library was set up for black records and programs. The station also began a series of programs on Youth and Draft counseling.

          Two new programs aimed at minorities were created:

           “African Worlds” was started by UH Professor Ifekandu Umunna, director of UH’s Black Studies Program and “Minority Viewpoint” which aired on Monday evenings at 8:30 p.m.  Fourteen “Minority Viewpoint” programs were produced by Joan R. Singer in conjunction with the Anti-Defamation League of B’nai B’rith.  Programs dealt with such issues as “Russian Jewry”, “Puerto Ricans Among Us”, “Inner City Problems” and “Anti-Semitism”.

 

 

          Show hosts in 1972 were as follows:

          Morning Rock: Marc Andrews, Timm Muldoon,

          Morning Classics: Tricia Beatty, Mike Joseph, Mike Ditkoff, Anne Harte, Leslie Terry,

          Afternoon Rock: Bob Smolen, Joe Young, Uncle Dave, Nel, Joe Soya, Rob Weiss, Bob Walker, Bob Carlin,

          Dinnertime Classics: Patrick Hill, Dawn Magi, Joe Barone, Patrick Hill, Bonnie Sinclair,

          Accent on Jazz:  Bob Dunkley, Art Barlow, Cliff Scheley,

          Soul: Maceo Woods,

          Gothics Blinp Works:  Jim Shanahan,  Pete Godoff, Bob Katz, Rob Weitz and Roger Stauss.

          God Presents:  Mark Persky.

          Opera: Joe Terzo.

          A program called “Gothic Annix” was added in the fall which ran from 3am to 7 am on Saturday mornings.  The host was Bud Pyatak.

 

          News compiled by the WWUH News Department was heard Weekdays at noon and 5 p.m and announced by Alex Leslie, Bob Cleary, Steve Goldberg, Dave Radka, Lois Jacobs, Mike Joseph, .   WWUH also carried programs from National Public Radio via tape.

 

          Staff awards presented at the Banquet to: Mel Peppers, Tricia Beatty, Dawn Magi, Roger Stauss, Anne Harte and Michael Ditkoff, with a special award to Louis Sampliner.

 

         

          World News:  President Nixon makes unprecedented eight-day visit to Communist China (Feb. 17); Britain takes over direct rule of Northern Ireland in bid for peace (March 24); Eleven Israeli athletes at Olympic Games in Munich are killed after eight members of an Arab terrorist group invades Olympic Village; (Sept. 5); Nixon orders "Christmas bombing" of North Vietnam (Dec.). Background: Vietnam War; Gov. George C. Wallace of Alabama is shot by Arthur H. Bremer at Laurel, Md., political rally (May 15); Five men are apprehended by police in attempt to bug Democratic National Committee headquarters in Washington, D.C.'s Watergate complex—start of the Watergate scandal (June 17); US Supreme Court rules that death penalty is unconstitutional (June 29).

         

 

Fall 1972

 

WWUH was not exempt from the problem of record theft that all college stations are subject to.  In an effort to catch those responsible, spot checks were done by ECOM members, and a one-month moratorium was placed on having guests in the studio.

 

          The ECOM approved the printing of 3,000 Guides for October. Program Guide Advertising rates:  full page - $50, half page - $30, and quarter page - $20.

 

          Tom Canady resigned as Program Director due to graduate workload. Roger Stauss was appointed Acting Program Director in September and became the permanent PD in October.  Roger's first act was to request the ECOM's permission to program the station 24 hours on Saturday, giving the station a full 24-hour broadcast day.

 

          In November the station held a special fund raiser for the Newington Children’s Hospital.  Hartford Mayor George Athanson auctioned off his varicolored tie for $10, US Senator Lowell Weicker went on the air to appeal for funds and US Senator George McGovern of South Dakota, presidential candidate against Richard Nixon, sent a telegram in support.  Secretary of State Gloria Schaffer and Connecticut Attorney General Robert Killian appeared via tape.  Sports legends Mickey Mantle and Joe DiMaggio also participated via taped appeals. The 40 hour Marathon was held in Holcomb Commons in the GSU brought in $700 in pledges.

 

Elections held in November had the following results:  Operatons Director - Tricia Beatty; Director of Minotity Affairs – Anne Harte and Director of Development – Judy Corcoran.

              

Active members on the roster in the fall:  Dave Achelis, Charlie Allen, Ron Barisano, Art Barlow, John Barone, Sharon Boudreau, Tricia Beatty, Andy Brownstein, Phil Cabot, Tom Canaday, Paul Cailler, Bob Cleary, Judy Corcoran, Ron Davis, Michael Ditkoff, Bob Dunkley, Roger Fennig, Peter Godoff, Eileen Harris, Anne Harte, Patrick Hill, Stu Jaegger, Pam Johnson, Ynonne Jordan, Bob Katz, Mike Joseph, John LaBella, Sandy Lavery, Alex Leslie, Dawn Magi, Tim Muldoon, Bill Papoosha, Mark Persky, Mel Pepper, Carl Prutting, Dave Radka, Cliff Scheley, Jim Shanahan, Steve Shore, Bob Smolin, Terry Sobestanovich, Joe Soya, Roger Stauss, Leslie Terry, Joe Terzo, Jim Theobald, Larry Titus,  Rob Weitz, Nel Wilson, Stu Yeager.

Advisors to the station were Dr. Viamonte, Dr. Umunna, Ed Nelson, Ken Kalish and Tom Canaday.

From the November 20, 1972 WWUH Newsletter:

During the Thanksgiving vacation, we will be renovating the studio, tearing down walls, putting up walls, fixing, destroying, etc. Hopefully the studios will be improved. . .”

 

The ECOM discussed changing the two At-Large ECOM positions to two new positions:  Minority Affairs Director and Development Director.  The former would be responsible for coordinating and developing the ethnic and specialty programming on the station, and the latter position would be in charge of fund raising, promotions and staff development.  These new positions were approved pending ratification of the Constitution.  Anne Harte was later elected as Director of Minority Affairs and Judy Corcoran was elected to the position of Director of Development. Tricia Beatty became Operations Director.

The station entered into an agreement with the Connecticut Transit bus company that, starting September 1, the bus would carry promotional advertising for WWUH on the back and sides of select buses for a period of one year.

The October 26, 1972 ECOM meeting minutes end with the following statement:

"…Discussion tabled, immediate adjournment (news over teletype of Vietnam PEACE agreement!!!). 12:50 pm.”

The ECOM drew up the following temporary policies regarding personal "editorializing" by announcers:  "Any announcer may state his opinion as long as he makes it known over the air that it is his opinion and not necessarily the opinion of the station.  No announcer is to make any statement that may be taken as libelous.  No announcer is to state his opinion on personal issues or on internal station policy or decisions."

          An agreement was reached to exchange advice and expertise with Weaver High School station WQTQ (89.9 FM).

          University of Hartford Professor Viamonte undertook a survey of students on campus during the fall of 1972 as part of a class project.  The results show that 92% know where WWUH is on the dial, and 56% listen to WWUH part of the time.

Fall of 1972 brought more concerts to the UH Campus, including one featuring the band Ten Years After with James Taylor as the opening act.

          The station held a fund-raising Marathon for the Newington Children's Hospital Nonember 3rd, with a remote broadcast and celebrity visits. $3,000 was raised.

 

Major News Stories during 1972:

          President Nixon makes unprecedented eight-day visit to Communist China and meets with Mao Zedong (Feb. 17); Britain takes over direct rule of Northern Ireland in bid for peace (March 24); Eleven Israeli athletes at Olympic Games in Munich are killed after eight members of an Arab terrorist group invades Olympic Village; five guerrillas and one policeman are also killed (Sept. 5); Nixon orders "Christmas bombing" of North Vietnam (Dec.). Background: Vietnam War; Gov. George C. Wallace of Alabama is shot by Arthur H. Bremer at Laurel, Md., political rally (May 15); Five men are apprehended by police in attempt to bug Democratic National Committee headquarters in Washington, D.C.'s Watergate complex—start of the Watergate scandal (June 17); US Supreme Court rules that death penalty is unconstitutional (June 29).

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