WWUH RADIO HISTORY
1973 Text
This section is under construction and should be considered in draft form.  Your input is invited.  If you want to add material, make suggestions, correct the record, etc, please email us at wwuh@hartford.eduAnd if you have photos to share of your time at WWUH please let us know that as well.  While we strive to present information that is as accurate as possible please consider the information below for entertainment purposes only.

Spring 1973

 

Excerpt from "Insight into WWUH, Semester Report, December, 1973 by Phil Cabot, General Manager:
    "First semester was a period of change at WWUH.  First the constitution was changed to correct many discrepancies.  Second, three members of the station were elected to the executive committee.
    "One area of great change was Engineering.  The engineering department under the guidance of Charles Allen, Chief Engineer, and Stew Yager, Assistant Chief, has been extremely busy this semester.  The department has been responsible for the studio renovation which was been started.  Along with the aid of Ed Nelson, Professor at Ward, the studio renovation when completed will make WWUH's facilities one of the best college radio facilities around.  Although we are still tight for space, we have re-designed the studios for the most optimum use.  This includes a combination talk studio and production studio which will be used for producing those much needed educational programs, a completely remodeled FM studio and a news booth.  Also the department is still working to move the transmitter to WTIC's facility on Avon Mountain. If approved by the FCC this move will be made this spring and as a result WWUH will be the most powerful educational station in CT.
        "As always our primary concern is that of programming.  Roger Stauss, Program Director, is attempting to attain our goal for more educational programming.  Once this goal is achieved WWUH will truly become the "Voice of the University of Hartford."  Roger is attempting to get more participation on the part of the University community.  One example of what has already started are the threatre reviews done by John Balmer, Prof. in the Comm and Theater Departments.  Mr. Balmer has been reviewing several plays around the area and makes very knowledgeable comments on each.  Roger and I both feel that the university community is comprised of so many valuable human resources that the limit to our educational programming is virtually non-existent.  WWUH has also been using many educational tape networks including Pacifica, National Public Radio and the BBC.
    "During Marathon last year the Student Association generously donated $2000 for the replacement and enlargement of the record library.  Jim Shanahan, music director, has been busy at work ordering records and it is expected that we will have one of the finest record libraries when he is finished.
    One thing that I have been very interested in, for public affairs, is the installation of a line into the state capitol in Hartford.  If we are able to install this line we will be able to broadcast different sessions of the legislature which are of particular interest to the Hartford community. This is another example of our continued interest for more public service programming.
    "Have you ever wished you could talk back to your radio?  Well soon you will be able to.  Roger Stauss and I are planning to conduct a telephone talk show that will enable our listeners to do just that.  Listeners will be able to ask questions, suggest ideas, and state opinions regarding WWUH.  We need this kind of feedback in order to become a community minded station.
    "The ideas that Roger and his staff have come up with assure me that WWUH will be growing in the direction which will make the university very impressed and excited.  Eventually we hope that WWUH will be one of the major public relations outlets of the university.
    "Unfortunately, unlike the rest of the station, we are weak financially.  (The audit of our accounts) prepared by Business Manager Michael Ditkoff (shows) we have already been forced to spend a substantial portion of this year's budget.  However the excess spending has been forecast due to the many important and expensive projects which had been planned for this year including the renovation and the move.   Although this puts a financial strain on the rest of the station we feel that these projects were very necessary in order to improve and maintain WWUH.
    "A new department which has been formed at WWUH is that of development.  Under the guidance of Judy Corcoran, this department is responsible for the continued growth of WWUH.  This department is also responsible for the Program Guide, Personnel and Public Relations.
    "Although the Program Guide is still in financially poor shape, we feel this is one of the more important products of WWUH and is worth running at a deficit to maintain.  Terry Sobestanovich, Program Guide Editor, is attempting to increase advertising and subscriptions to the Guide.
    "The personnel of WWUH has been substantially increased this year.   We now have more than forty active members and associate members at the station.  Judy and I are both very happy with this large turn out and hope the personnel department continues to grow.
    "Judy and her public relations department have been very busy this semester.  Not only have we been advertising on twenty three busses throughout the area, our Newington Children's Hospital Drive brought the University and our station very good publicity.  WDRC presented a half h our program on this drive alobng with a five minute presentation on channel 3.  Channel 30 and WTIC radio both publicized the event and there were articles in the Hartford Courant and the Times.
    "One of the most exciting departments this year has been the News Department.  Under the leadership of Andy Brownstein, News Director, the news department has started on the road to becoming one of the best news departments in the state.  One of Andy's primary concerns is to go out and get many actualities throughout CT.  This was evident during the recent elections when student reporters were sent to cover the visits of Sen. McGovern, Sargent Shriver, VP Agnew and Senator Kennedy.  As one who took part in covering some of these events I feel that not only are these events interesting to cover but also very educational.
    "Andy, who took over the department early in the semester, has also held a seminar in news reporting for his staff with Paul Kuntz, News Director of WTIC as a guest speaker.  This is one example how professionals from throughout CT are willing to help train our staff.
    "Andy also realizes the importance of using other news sources besides the UPI and has started using newspapers and experimenting with other news services such as "Earth News."
    "Continuing with our goal for community involvement Andy has started a program of training and using high school students in the Hartford area to do news.  Not only does this interest them in our station, but also in the univ. and the field of broadcasting.  Programs such as these benefit everyone involved.
    "Another idea that was instituted by the News staff was the formation of a booklet with all faculty of the university listed and their main field of interest.  This booklet will enable the department to contact "experts" when news stories need further investigation.    
    "I have been very impressed with what Andy and his department have achieved and look forward to a great news department.
    "One department which has always been of great concern to me has been that of minority affairs.  When the Constitution of WWUH was changed earlier this year this department was put onto the Executive Committee.  This alone was one of the station's most worthwhile achievements.  Anne Harte, who was elected director of this department, hopes to increase minority involvement int he station and to increase minority educational programming.  Already this year Dr. Umunna, Professor in the Black Studies Program, has started an African program once per week and has received several letters praising the show.  Also, a Jamaican program has been presented once per week. Several tapes from our tape networks have also dealt with minority subjects.
    "Another area of minority affairs I have asked Anne to look into is some kind of exchange program with Weaver High School.  Weaver has started a station of their own and perhaps why could use some help with their station.  I feel that we Weaver nearby it is very important to start programs such as these.
    "With the aid of Tricia Beatty, Operations Director, I have been attempting to make WWUH a station the university can be proud of.  Being owned by the Board of Regents, we realize the importance of university and community involvement in WWUH.  Tricia and I are attempting to set up a Connecticut College Broadcasting Association which will enable all member stations to use each others programs.  This will allow WWUH to present some of its educational programs elsewhere in the state.  Also Clark Smidt, who is now FM Coordinator for WBZ in Boston, has informed us that eventually he would like to use some of our educational programming on WBZ.  This would help spread the university's voice throughout New England.  Another project I am working on, with Roger Stauss, is a survey of FM broadcasting in CT.  This survey will aid in in determining what is needed in the way of programming on FM.
    "WWUH continues to present editorial opinions on controversial subjects, including the elections and the incident at Baton Rouge.  As a "public service" media we feel editorial opinions are very important.
    "Dr. Daniel Viamonte, Chairman of the Comm and Theater Dept, has also started a program whereby students taking an introductory communications course are able to receive credit for a lab conducted at our station.  We feel this is one more way in which the university can use the facilities of our station.
    "It has been a very busy semester at WWUH and as you can see by this report a very beneficial one.  I hope you have found this report to be of interest and look forward to any comments you may have."

The station routinely signed off at 2 AM most nights, although Gothic announcers were allowed to stay on the whole night if they so chose.  Sign on was always at 6 AM.  By mid-1973, the All Night Show was added, making the WWUH the first college station in the state to broadcast 24 -hours a day.

WWUH operated an on-campus AM station, known as “WWUH-AM” during the early years of the station, but it was mostly neglected by station staff due to the demands of keeping the FM station going.  Since students were able to get the station on the FM dial, and the AM signal did not go off campus, the WWUH donated the AM system to the Student Association.  Thus, WSAM (Student Association Media) was born. The donation of the WWUH-AM equipment allowed WSAM to be heard in the dorms on campus through a process known as "carrier current radio" (which utilizes the building wiring as an antenna). 

 The only advantage that WWUH had with the AM station was that since the AM was unlicensed, commercial spots could be sold. However, this required that the AM programming be separate from the FM, something that was difficult to arrange due to the demands of the FM side of the operation. 

Special programming was produced and aired for Black Week, March 5-12. The station aired a series of PSA’s on Vietnam aid and revitalization and in July the station started airing 30 minute episodes of the BBC’s “Sherlock Holmes.”

The ECOM discussed having detailed classical programming notes in the Guide to help make it more interesting to listeners.

The ECOM voted unanimously in February to go ahead with the transmitter move, despite concerns about whether we had our programming act together, whether we had enough money, and whether we had enough technical personnel put on hold because of the pending sale of WTIC to the Washington Post. 

          Money allocated by the ECOM for the FCC Application:

                             $5,000 from University

                             $4,000 from Restricted Account

                             $3,000 from Operating Budget

                             $1,400 from donations

                             $11,650 Equipment costs

A Mini Marathon to get Guide subscriptions was scheduled for March 3-5.

Joe McKernan designed the 1973 T-shirts.  The shirts cost the station $0.90 each, and the station ordered 300 of them to be sold at cost to staff and offered to listeners for a $5 donation.  The station also printed WWUH matchbooks, along with “bicycle bumper stickers” and car-window stickers. 

A meeting was held with UH President Dr. Woodruff to discuss the University's opinion regarding obscenity in public affairs programming.

The station banquet was held at the Steak and Brew in Farmington, CT in April.  Hartford Mayor George Athanson was in attendance as was UH president Dr. Archibald Woodruff.  The university’s Helen Loy was presented with the second annual WWUH Outstanding Service Award.

A review of station membership on February 22, 1973 listed 32 active members.         

Elections were held in March with the following results:  General Manager: Judith M. Corcoran, Station Manager, Joel Schechter, News Director: Andy Brownstein, Operations Director: Marc Andrews, Station Manager: Joel Schechter, Program Director: Roger Stauss, Business Manager: Steve Shore

Chief Engineer: Charles Allen, Director of Minority Affairs: Mel Peppers (Maceo Woods), Director of Development: Terry Sobestanovich, Music Director: Jim Shanahan, Production Director: Ron Barisan, Assistant Chief Engineer: Stew Jaegar, Personnel Director: Sharon Boudreau , Sports Director: Carl Prutting.

          Staff:  Roger Stuass,

 

 

Fall 1973

 

Station management included Judy Corcoran-General Manger; Marc Andrews, Operations Director; Roger Stauss-Program Director; Steve Shore-Business Manager; Maceo Woods,-Director of Minority Affairs; Charlie Allen-Chief Engineer; Stew Jaeger-Assistant Engineer; Jim Shanahan-Music Director; Ron Barisano-Production Director; Steve Foss-Traffic Manager; Carl Prutting ;Sports Director; Sharon Boudreau-Personal Director and Terry Sobestanovich-Director of Development.

The staff consisted of Vickie Germaine, Steve Messino, Tricia Beatty, Margi Adler, Art Barlow, John Barone, Ron Davis, Bob Dunkley, Peter Godoff, Randy Goule, Eileen Harris, Don Helfer, Patrick Hill, Marty Kayne, John Klupsak, Alex Leslie, John McKinney, Debbie Nelson, Mark Persky, Neil Portnoy, John Ramsey, Sandy Rosoff, Joel Schechter, Cliff Schley, Bob Smolen, Leslie Terry, Joe Terzo, Leon Thompson, Rob Weitz, Ray White, Bob Kiel, Neil Alein, Dave Delisle, Paul Rosenbloom, Marty O’Toole, Lloyd Robinson, Hank Michkoff

Advisors:  Philip Cobot, Clark Smidt, Ken Kalish, Michael Forman, Tom Canady, Ed Nelson, Dr. Umunna, Dr. Viamonte.

The Second Annual WWUH Outstanding Service Award was given to Ms. Helen Loy, chairman of the UH Legislative Affairs office the UH.  The award was presented at the station’s annual banquet, held this year at the Steak and Brew in Farmington.

Judy approached the Student Association with a request of $3,000 to go towards the transmitter move. 

 

From a September 6, 1973 memo to Dean McKinley:

WWU is growing.  We recently received permission for the Federal Communications Commission to move our transmitting facilities to Avon mountain. This means that WWUH we be broadcasting to almost the entire statoe of Connecticut  However, currently we do not have sufficient funds to carry out our plans.

Presently our main concern is moving the transmitter.   The entire cost will be $12500, of which we have only $9,500.  W are in a great hurry to ge this money as we are working against time --- the Mountain Move must be made within two months before the cold weather sets in, and the equipment takes between thirty and sixty days to deliver.  We would also like to purchase a tape recorder that would allow us to record UH lectures, community happenings, press conferences  etc.  We are an educational station and such plans could greatly increase public affairs programming.  We would also like to purchase a “Sherlock Holmes Series” from the BBC at a cost of $1300.  And last but not lease this year we were forced to hire a chief engineer because our technical staff was very weak.

“Radio is growing rapidly,. Now many high schools are starting their own radio stations.  For example, WWUH is helping Weaver High School organize their new station.  With this new interest in radio broadcasting among high school students, if WWUH grows to become a better quality station, WWUH could attract many new perspective freshmen.

Since FCC rules required that WWUH’s chief engineer have a first class license, and since the station constitution required that the chief engineer be a UH student, the only person with such a license on the staff was Larry Titus, who had been with the station since the beginning. The ECOM agreed to pay for Larry to take 2-3 courses at Ward College.  In return, Larry would sign up as Chief Engineer.  He could not put in the required 15 hours a week, but would keep the station legal and on the air.  Larry was elected to the position on September 20, 1973.

From the September 18, 1973 ECOM Meeting minutes:

"The Student Union Board of Governors (SUBOG) decided that the public address system in the campus center will be set on WKND (a local black station) from Noon until 2:30 PM daily, and on WWUH the rest of the time."

General Manager Judy Corcoran set up the Connecticut College Broadcasters Association and held an all-day conference at U of H with speakers from local stations. Topics included sales, programming, technical, legal and ethical issues.

Telephone and Electricity were set up at our location on Avon Mountain with the move planned for early November.  The station would be off the air for 1-4 weeks.      

Several options were discussed to raise additional funds for the transmitter move, including a special Marathon, asking the Student Association for a donation, and borrowing from UH.  The ECOM decided to borrow. In preparation for the transmitter move, the engineering staff dug a trench from the building to the tower, and the antenna was ordered.

  The necessity of the United Press International newswire, which cost the station 16% of its budget each year, was questioned by many staff members who were concerned about using it effectively.  The ECOM had asked announcers to read some news items at the start of each show but not everyone was doing so.

Program on the West Indies is auditioned.

After six years of hard use, the station had out-grown the tiny Sparta air studio board. In addition, the board was also wearing out.  The ECOM allocated $3,000 to purchase a state-of-the-art Fairchild ten-channel audio console for the Air Studio, and the Sparta board that had been used in the air studio was repaired and moved into the production studio.

          In November, the ECOM approved the airing of PSAs for Trinity College's radio station, WRTC (89.3 FM).  They were off the air with transmitter troubles, with no money for repairs. 

WWUH had its own problems with the new Fairchild Board, serial number 1. Even though the board had dramatically improved the improved the air sound and expanded the on-air capabilities of the announcers doing shows, it was problematic.  Steve Shore, the Business Manager said he wouldn’t pay for it since he was so disgusted with the situation.  Optionally, he would send the company $1 a week until it was paid off (about 3000 weeks later!)  Andy Bronstein proclaimed at that time he would be 38 and wondering what everyone looked like!).

The station produced a special Christmas show featuring 160 kids from the Annie Fisher Elementary School and the Annie Fisher Choir.  Sandra Rosoff offered some special holiday readings and the Hartt Brass and Rhythm Department, along with the Emmanuel Congregational Church performed the Bach Christmas Oratorio. In addition, the Hartt College Suzuki class for 3-8 year olds performed at the event, where volunteer Marc Persky appeared as Santa Claus.

Paul Payton wrote the following about his experiences at WWUH, which started in 1973: One of the late night progressive shows; I had also guested on the Street Corner Serenade. The blessing of 'UH for me and many compadres was that you guys let us come up while we were "between stations" and keep our chopssharp. You gave me a place to hang my hat, stay in touch with the trade, and not coincidentally allowed me to help pump up record service a bit for 'UH.

My last show there was filling in for Paul Bezanker on Street Corner Serenade one week when he couldn't make it. It was wonderful - it's the only show I did from the new studio, and I felt like I was *really* back on the radio! (I think I brought up about 4 hours of music for the two hour show!) But the magic of 'UH (and other "real" radio stations in college environments, like WBRU - as opposed to 10-watt or closed-circuit ego trips) is that no matter how much one does for the station, it always does more for you - sometimes you just don't realize in what ways until later.

          Cath Spann offered the following recollection about 1973:  I remember rolling in at 6AM one morning to do FM on Toast, only to be greeted by this man wearing what I would describe as a small leather loincloth. That was Sweet Pie, and that's how I remember him, sitting practically naked in the announcer's chair that morning, with long curly brown hair and a smile. That'll wake you up fast!

General Manager Judy Corcoran set up the Connecticut College Broadcasters Association and held an all-day conference at U of H with speakers from local stations. Topics included sales, programming, technical, legal, and ethical issues.

Telephone and electricity were set up at WWUH’s location on Avon Mountain with the move planned for early November.  The station would be off the air for 1-4 weeks.

Several options were discussed to raise additional funds for the transmitter move, including a special Marathon, asking the Student Association for a donation, and borrowing from UH.  The ECOM decided to borrow. In preparation for the transmitter move, the engineering staff dug a trench from the building to the tower, and the antenna was ordered.

The necessity of the United Press International newswire, which cost the station 16% of its budget each year, was questioned by many staff members who were concerned about using it effectively.  The ECOM had asked announcers to read some news items at the start of each show but not everyone was doing so.

Program on the West Indies is auditioned.

After six years of hard use, the station had out-grown the tiny Sparta air studio board. In addition, the board was also wearing out.  The ECOM allocated $3,000 to purchase a state-of-the-art Fairchild ten-channel audio console for the Air Studio, and the Sparta board that had been used in the air studio was repaired and moved into the production studio.

          In November, the ECOM approved the airing of PSAs for Trinity College's radio station, WRTC (89.3 FM).  They were off the air with transmitter troubles, with no money for repairs. 

WWUH had its own problems with the new Fairchild Board, serial number 1. Even though the board had dramatically improved the improved the air sound and expanded the on-air capabilities of the announcers doing shows, it was problematic.  Steve Shore, the Business Manager said he wouldn’t pay for it since he was so disgusted with the situation.  Optionally, he would send the company $1 a week until it was paid off (about 3000 weeks later!)  Andy Bronstein proclaimed at that time he would be 38 and wondering what everyone looked like!).

The station produced a special Christmas show featuring 160 children from the Annie Fisher Elementary School and the Annie Fisher Choir.  Sandra Rosoff offered some special holiday readings and the Hartt Brass and Rhythm Department, along with the Emmanuel Congregational Church performed the Bach Christmas Oratorio. In addition, the Hartt College Suzuki class for 3-8 year olds performed at the event, where volunteer Marc Persky appeared as Santa Claus.

Major News Stories during 1973:

A ceasefire is signed, ending involvement of American ground troops in the Vietnam War. (Jan. 28); US bombing of Cambodia ends, marking official halt to 12 years of combat activity in Southeast Asia (Aug. 15).; Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) hikes oil prices tremendously in retaliation for Western countries' involvement in Yom Kippur War. Nixon, on national TV, accepts responsibility, but not blame, for Watergate; accepts resignations of H. R. Haldeman and John D. Ehrlichman, fires John W. Dean III as counsel (April 30), Spiro T. Agnew resigns as Vice President and then pleads no contest to charges of evasion of income taxes while Governor of Maryland (Oct. 10), In the "Saturday Night Massacre," Nixon fires special Watergate prosecutor Archibald Cox and Deputy Attorney General William D. Ruckelshaus; Attorney General Elliot L. Richardson resigns (Oct. 20).; US Supreme Court rules on Roe v. Wade.

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