WWUH RADIO HISTORY
2002 Year In Review
This section is under construction and should be considered in draft form.  Your input is invited.  If you want to add material, make suggestions, correct the record, etc, please email us at wwuh@hartford.edu.  And if you have photos to share of your time at WWUH please let us know that as well.

Managers: John Ramsey – General Manager and Chief Engineer, Bonnie Hast – Operations Director, Susan Mullis – Director of Development, Nicole Godburn – Program Director, Mary Dowst – Business Manager, Mike DeRosa – Community Affairs Director  Andy Taylor – Music Director, Ed McKeon – Folk Music Director, Kevin Shivley – Classical Music Director, Jazz Officer Spaak – Jazz Music Director, Brian Grossjean – World Music Director, Peter Rost -  Blues Music Director, Scott Baron – Asst. Chief Enginieer, Matt Slywka – Urban Music Director, Chris Larsen – Web Master and Recording Studio Director, Kriss Powell - Assistant Operations Director.

 

 

 

McNal Allison, Scott Baron, Keith Barrett, Denise Basture, Larry Bilansky, Jim Bolan, Bart Bozzi , Keith Brown, Michael Carrol, Bob Celmer, Mark Channon, Jim Christensen, Deborah Conklin, Mark DeLorenzo, Dave Demaw, Mike DeRosa, Amy Dement, Scott Deshefy, Steve Dieterich, Vijay Dixit, Bill Domler, Mary Dowst, Chuck Dube, Al Dzikas, George Michael Evica, Stu Feldman, Dawn Finnemore, Mario Greitti, Donna Giddings, Nicole Godburn, Brian Grosjean, Bonnie Hast, Pretlow Harris, Gilberto Heredia, Dean Hilderbrandt, John Holder, Harvey Jassem, Wayne Jones, Rick LaBrie, Chris Larsen, Gregory Laxer, Gary Levin, Rohan Long, Kevin Lynch, Tony Magno, Doug Maine, Chris Marti, Mike Marti, Ed McKeon, Bill Measom, Gail Meyers-Jaworski, Peter Michaelson, Phillip Mitchell, Susan Mullis, Nay Nasser, Ted Neihay, Chuck Obuchowski, Kevin O’Toole, Stephen Petke, Anthony Price, John Prytko, Johnny Prytko, jr, John Ramsey, Henrique Ribeiro, Maurice Robertson, Katherine Rossner, Peter Rost, Mark Santini, John Scott, Jack Seidl, Kevin Shively, Matt Slywka, Kapil Taneja, Andy Taylor, Steve Theaker, Dwight Thurston, Colin Tipton, Rob Turner, Terry Weichand, Lloyd Weir, Dave Zaluda, Andy Zeldin.

 

2002 would see the passing of two members of the family, John LaBella and Justin Campeau.

 John LaBella, had been very active in WWUH in the early seventies.  From there he moved on to WTIC-AM where he spent close to a decade doing prime time radio. Dallas Texas came next, where John became the number one morning man in one of the largest radio markets in the country! John LaBella passed away on March 4, the victim of a tragic traffic accident in Dallas, Tx. 

Charlie Horwitz wrote:

 “Johnny was one of the first hosts of “FM on Toast” and it was there that he started honing his radio skills. While the rest of us played radio, John lived it. When I met him in 1969, all he ever wanted to do was be a disk jockey. That's not really accurate because he didn't follow the groups like the rest of us did (though he certainly where who was IN and who wasn't). John wanted to be an Air Talent very much in the Bob Steel mold. In fact in an age when no of us had a direction or a clear goal, John had already chosen his and was taking every opportunity to work on his skills. Ripping and reading news, taking transmitter log readings, doing spots, all were of keen interest to him. He wanted to be the next Bob Steel in Hartford radio. John achieved this goal and worked for a number of years at WTIC but ultimately returned to Dallas.

“For a person like John LaBella, WWUH was the perfect place to start a life long career with broadcasting. We graduated in 1972 and he received his degree in History. Not bad for a transfer student from Renseleer Poly Tech who started out majoring in Engineering. I think he used his History skills to do his graduate work on Doo-Wop groups  of the '50's. Anyway - Please pass the word around the station that one of the Old Guys has left the building.”

In the fall of 2002, Hartt student and WWUH classics host Justin Campeau passed away after a short but valiant fight with leukemia.  John Ramsey relates “Justin was with us for such a short period of time.  His sudden illness took us all by surprise, and everyone expected that It would only be a matter of time before he would be back on the air. Unfortunately, we were all wrong. Upon learning of his death, I tried a number of times to write a fitting eulogy, but I simply couldn’t find the words.  Synthesis host Joan Holiday offered to write one, and while I wasn’t comfortable at first shirking what I thought was my responsibility, as soon as I read the beautiful eulogy that Joan had written, I know that I would never be able to even come close.”

           

A LOVING AU REVOIR TO JUSTIN CAMPEAU

I just came back from Justin’s funeral. I wasn’t Justin’s best friend. I hadn’t known him for even a year when he became ill with leukemia. He hosted Wednesday Evening Classics, the show after my Wednesday Synthesis slot, and through that we got to know each other pretty well – our tastes in music and web sites, our shared affection for the Spigot Bar and chocolate. We also, I think, shared a sense of the absurd, and were both pretty easily amused. (I know people use that as an insult, but I feel it’s a good trait to cultivate, the ability to be easily amused.) Often when we were together in the WWUH air studio Justin would start tittering his high, silly laugh, usually over little more than nothing, and I would always start laughing back, until we were in a fit and couldn’t stop.  Like kids in church who know they shouldn’t be laughing but can’t help it. I enjoyed those times with Justin.            

He and my boyfriend became friends as well, and Justin, knowing we were listening in the car, would always tease him on-air, dedicating songs or reading quotes to "Sir Neville Mariner", his nickname for Neville, and mocking his English accent. I never knew a DJ with Justin’s style of delivery before, and I am certain I never will again. He was great. Unique. Riveting. Not to mention extremely knowledgeable about classical music. When he was ill and I (a rock chick through and through) filled in on his show for the summer, he would call and threaten me with vague physical harm "if you ever read another ‘recording number’ and record label off a CD again!" Sorry, Justin.

Justin had a quirky and delightful sense of humor, a love of fun and pranks, a quick and easy lopsided smile, and an unpretentious penetrating intelligence paired with wisdom beyond his 21 years. He was a student at Hartt, and a very gifted violist. He was instrumental in activating a chapter of the musical fraternity at UHa, and continued working to get it going while in his hospital bed during his illness. He was successful, being inducted into the fraternity just weeks before his death. I have a feeling he would have been successful at whatever he determined to do.

Justin was that kind of man. He was a loving and dependable shoulder and ear to his innumerable friends. He was silly, and serious, and gifted, and determined, and unjudging. But what stood out most about Justin is that he was positively incandescent with life. He loved it. He knew what was important in it. He radiated an easy joy. I hope that his parents take some comfort in the fact that all the love they obviously poured into their son, he poured back out to the world one hundred thousand fold. Justin Campeau was a truly good man.

So Justin, I know you can read this. At least, I know these words and feelings are making their way to you somehow, and that you’ll overlook my poor writing and understand what I am trying to say. I know you’re there. I can hear your laugh, and know you can hear mine in return. I miss you, my friend. We all do.  But this is an au revoir, not a goodbye: I look forward to seeing you again.

          John Ramsey reflected:

“The passing of these two individuals had a profound effect in one way or another on just about everyone associated with WWUH.  The loss of John Labelle, probably one of the nicest guys who ever lived, hit the alumni who knew his first hand and who had worked with him here at WWUH in the seventies the hardest.  Many of these folks reacted with shock and dismay and posted wonderful stories about John on the “thesedays” group on the Internet.  I shared a number of these recollections with the staff at a general meeting so that the legacy that John left would not be forgotten.

 I had met John only once, but felt that I knew him well not only  from his work here at UH, and also from the daily show he did on Hartford’s WTIC for years. The fact that John had to be taken from us in his prime and due to what many consider negligence made the loss even harder for his friends to fathom.

“The loss of Justin shocked the entire staff, not just because he was a “colleague,” but because he was so young and because he seemed to get sick so quickly. He had been with the station less than a year, but in some ways he had always been with us because he was a Uher.  Even those who did know have the chance to get to know him realized just how special this gentleman was when they saw the effect his death had on the volunteers who did know him.

          The passing of these two wonderful men, and that of Bill Domler in 2001, certainly made me pause to consider how mortal we all are.”

 

With the input from the station’s volunteer staff, the ECOM has been working over the last couple of months identifying key station areas in need of improvement or areas where a little bit of attention would result in substantial growth. The first three areas that the ECOM will be working on this year are: Promotion, Staff Development and upgrading Music Department equipment and procedures.

The lack of station promotion was identified as a major concern and the ECOM has decided to tackle this issue first.  Some of the ideas in the planning stages include the formation of a Publicity Committee, utilizing station listeners as well as WWUH volunteers, producing a campus-only issue of the Fall Program Guide, “wrapped” with a special cover and including text and pictures to appeal to students in an effort to get them to listen to WWUH and make them aware of the volunteer opportunities at the station and making it easier for volunteers to promote their station activities through the use of pre-printed forms from which Press Releases will be generated.

In the area of Staff Development, the ECOM has determined it would be very desirable that we have a Membership Director, someone who can coordinate our entire volunteer effort, including training, recruitment, staff recognition and the like.  Ideally this person would come from the existing staff.  If you are interested in learning more about this volunteer position, please contact John.

In the area of the Music Department, which is already running quite smoothly, the goals are to get some help so that new releases can be put out more quickly, purchase and upgrade our computer equipment to make processing of new releases easier and the expansion of our Music Database and purchase of discography software.

The fact that WWUH was the second station in the state to broadcast over the Internet, and the success of the station ‘s webcast was something everyone on the staff was proud of.  The ECOM considered adding a second stream to the WWUH web page, something like “WWUH-2”.  They made the following offer to the staff at the May meeting.  If a genre or genres were able to put together twelve hours of live programming for the new station, the station would invest in the equipment necessary to automate the other 12 hours of the day.xxxxxxx

 At the December 1, 2002 General Meeting, “Above and Beyond” awards went to the following volunteers: John Harris-for always being willing to do last minute fill-ins; Steve Petke-for his tireless work with the classical library, including processing the hundreds of CDs donated by “Beethoven.com”; Keith Barrett-for his work in keeping the classical department up to date, especially his special training sessions and recruitment efforts for classical announcers; Dean Hilderbrandt-for his work with the library and Andy Taylor-for doing such an outstanding job as Music Director.

Culture Dogs started first week of March.

New carpet was installed in the Air Studio, Production Studio and office areas in April.

The station passed the Connecticut Broadcasters Association’s Alternative Inspection Program,. 

The station did not broadcast the Monday night jazz series from Bushnell Park due to the lack of engineering personnel.

 

          Community Affairs

Community Affairs Director Mike DeRosa announced at the June meeting that we have just added a new local public affairs show to our line up: “Soapbox” will air on Thursdays at 12:30 pm.  He encourages all staffers to give it a listen, and welcomes feedback on the show.

He also announced that two new public affairs producers have joined the staff and that we will once again be airing the Sunken Garden Poetry Show this year.  This widely acclaimed show, recorded live at the Hillstead Museum in Farmington, CT, will air Sunday evenings at 8 pm during the summer.

 

Two New Producers: Rob Turrek Soapbox Thursday Noon and Kevin Limkins.

         

The Connecticut Legislature adopted the Amber Plan into the state’s Emergency Alerting System guidelines.  This system is used to notify the public of a missing child.

 

A reported and photographer from the Boston Globe visited the station to do an interview with George Micahel Evica.  The article on him ran in a June issue.

Folk Director Ed McKeon celebrated his 50th birthday on the air during his Wednesday morning show.  Literally dozens of performers stopped by the station and spoke or performed on the air to commemorate the event.

The Connecticut Legislature adopted the Amber Plan into the state’s Emergency Alerting System guidelines.  This system is used to notify the public of a missing child.

WAPJ in Torrington increased the number of WWUH rebroadcast hours to 90 per week.

Fall fund drive which was held in November had a $20,000 goal, but by the end of the week over $48,000 was pledged!  Shirt offered.

          Awards were given out at the December General Staff Meeting:  Henrique Ribeiro- Cultura e Vida received an award for 25 years of volunteer service; .  Mark DeLorenzo-The Greatest show From Earth received an award for 20 years.  Keith Barrett-Evening Classics, MikeDeRosa-Community Affairs Director/New Focus received awards for 15 years;   Deborah Conklin-classics host, Steve Dieterich-Celtic Aires received awards for 10 years of volunteer service.   Scott Deshefy-Tuesday Evening Classics, John Harris-Tuesday ANS, Dean Hildebrandt-Monday Morning Jazz, Rick LaBrie-Friday Evening Classics, Mike Marti-Monday Synthesis and Matt Slywka-Urban Director received awards for five years of service.

The December issue of the Program Guide featured an interview with Porcupine Tree by Susan Mullis and Mark DeLorenzo, “Notes from Celtic Airs” by Steve Dieterich, “The State of Bluegrass” by Kevin Lynch and “A Head Full of Peach Salsa” year end review of music by Kevin O’Toole.

 

Programming

As part of our efforts to recruit more students, Wednesday Synthesis host Joan Holiday volunteered to broadcast her show “The Happy Club” live from outside in September to promote student involvement.  Kris Powell and Colin Tipton assisted with the broadcast, which was very successful.  Between breaks, Joan engaged the student on-lookers in conversation about the station, while Colin handed out free CDs, Guides and stickers.

October 2 Ed McKeon celebrated his 50th birthday with an in-studio concert.  Several dozen listeners showed up.  The event featured performance by The Nields, Stan Sullivan, Dana Pomfret.

The discussion as to whether or not we would air the Bushnell Park Monday Night Jazz Series did not take place, as we are unable to accommodate the live broadcast schedule due to a lack of engineering help.  The jazz staff is looking into the possibility of recording the shows for later broadcast.

 

During the 60-day period from 3/31 to 5/31, the WWUH Listener Line received the highest average number of calls per day ever!  A total of 1922 calls were received during this period, an average of over 33 per day!  Two third of these calls were received in the last 30 days!  Specifically, the BLUEGRASS Line received 288 calls; the CELTICLINE Line 41 calls; the FOLKFONE 990 calls; the JAZZLINE 270 calls and the POLKALINE 403 calls. 

WAPJ changed their schedule to include Evening Classics, but dropped midnight to 6 M-F in favor of classical music.

Pacifica no more.  Free Speech Radio.

Possibility of staff awards, “Most Fill-Ins”, “Most Carts”.

          Monday Morning Jazz – Dean Hildebrandt

         

          Bushnell Park Jazz, next Wednesday ECOM

Pacifica no more.  Free Speech Radio.          

          Extension of 6 months for Web Copywrite

          Tony Magno interviewed  Arthur Spada, Commission of State Police on 6/22.

          Four large boxes of classical CDs have been donated by beethoven.com

          CD allocation: $5000

WAPJ changed their schedule to include Evening Classics, but dropped midnight to 6 M-F in favor of classical music.

 

Bach Birthday Bash

On Thursday Evening Classics

 

Considered by many to be the greatest composer of all time, J.S. Bach was born in Eisenach, Germany on March 21, 1685. He was the eighth child of Johann Ambrosius Bach and Elisabeth (Lammerhirt) Bach. The Bach family was one of several traditional families of musicians, who were often organized along guild lines and who earned their living as town musicians, organists and cantors. The family had produced musicians for several generations. Young Johann was taught to play the violin and harpsichord by his father, a court trumpeter in service to the Duke of Eisenach.

Johann Sebastian's mother died in 1694 and his father in 1695, so, as a young child, he went to live with his eldest brother, Johann Christoph, who was organist in Ohrdruf. The eldest brother taught Johann Sebastian to play the organ. Because of his playing skills and excellent singing voice, the teen-aged Bach soon attained a position as a singer and instrumentalist at the Michaelis monastery at Luneberg in 1700. After taking a post in Weimar in 1703 as a violinist, Bach became organist at the Neue Kirche in Arnstadt from 1703-1707, after which he briefly served at St. Blasisus in Muhlhausen as organist. Bach composed his famous Toccata and Fugue in d minor, BWV 565, whole in Muhlhausen.

Bach next took a post in Weimar for the Duke of Sachsen-Weimar in 1708, serving as court organist and playing in the orchestra, eventually becoming it leader. Bach left to become Kapellmeister at Cothen in December 1717. The six Brandenburg Concertos, BWV 1046-51, among many other works, date from his Cothen years. Bach became Kantor of the St. Thomas School in Leipzig in May 1723, and held that post until his death. It was in Leipiz that he composed the bulk of his religious and secular cantatas.

WWUH celebrated the birthday anniversary of Johann Sebastian Bach on Thursday, March 21, 2002 during Thursday Evening Classics. Among the works to be heard will be the Concerto for 4 Harpsichords BWV 1065, the secular Italian Cantata No, 209 Non sa che sia dolore, selections from his organ music and Motets sung by CONCORA.

          Volunteer Kevin O’Toole’s new show, “Culture Dogs” is now heard at 8:30 pm on Sunday evenings.

 

There has been an on-going discussion over the last month or so of eventually starting another WWUH on-line audio stream, separate from our existing live audio stream of 913 programming (assuming we can work out the copyright arrangements). "WWUH.com" would be the "brand name", and ultimately there could be several "flavors" of WWUH programming, including 91.3 live, as well as one or more specialty formats. We need to determine what would be required to accomplish this. One idea is to start another stream offering another genre 24 hours a day, utilizing the News Room to originate live programming part of the day with the rest of the day automated in the same format.  Is there interest in this from the staff?         

We are also looking into the idea of putting "on demand" audio on the web site, allowing things such as local public affairs programs and local specialty shows to be available on demand to our listeners.

It's not nailed down yet, but the ECOM is hoping to be able to allocate a total of $1000 per major genre for new releases, with $500 available in the first half of the FY and the second $500 after that as long as fund raiser goals are met. Smaller genres will be allocated $250-$500. This is not the "carrot and stick" approach to staff motivation, but simply the reality of the budgeting process.  When the money for CDs is allocated, the ECOM will require that: A. All on-air staffers in a given genre have an equal say how the money is spent.  B. Every means possible should be used to get the desired recordings for free or at a discount, such as by asking the artists themselves, agencies and/or record companies; asking staffers who have them to make a copy at our expense, etc.  The goal is to insure that we don’t spend money on things we can get for free or at a discount.  C. The purchases must be made through the UH purchase system, and not via individual announcers submitting expense vouchers.

          Genre director should start to compile a list of "missing" or "should have" CDs now, so that they will be prepared if and when the funds are made available.

          The new paved walkway was finally been installed between the designated WWUH parking spaces and the station’s entrance.  Instead of the crushed stone that was ordered, we were able to get an asphalt surface for the same amount! This walkway will help keep our new carpet (and your shoes) clean, will be much safer to walk on and is wide enough so that the University will be able to plow it in the winter!

The discussion as to whether or not we would air the Bushnell Park Monday Night Jazz Series did not take place, as we are unable to accommodate the live broadcast schedule due to a lack of engineering help.  The jazz staff is looking into the possibility of recording the shows for later broadcast.

 

          There are two characteristics of WWUH that make hosting a weekly jazz show a real joy.  One is the freedom to play whatever I want, which means whatever I like.  The other is the huge library of recordings accumulated over the 30 plus years of the station’s life.  There are more than 7,000 LPs and more than 8,000 CDs in the jazz library alone.

          The record companies send approximately 15 new jazz releases to us each week.  Since I am the one who processes them into the library, those that I like are first played at WWUH in the first hour of Monday Morning Jazz.  The second half hour includes music by musicians whose birthday or birth anniversary falls on the show date or who have passed away during the past week, plus previously-played new releases.  My favorite new release (the list is published on our jazz web page) is played a number of times over the course of two months or so.  In the third hour I often play music of well-known musicians who are appearing in the area (after announcing upcoming live events) and old CDs and LPs from the library.

          The emphasis of the show is on the music.  Talk is kept to a minimum and includes—besides the essential information needed on a jazz show of the name and composer of the tune, the names and instruments of the musicians, the year recorded, the place if a live performance, and the album name and label—background information on the musicians if they are not well-known and any usual aspects of the music heard. Interviews are rare.

          There are many styles of jazz, and most of them can be heard on one of more of our nine weekly jazz shows.  Styles most often heard on Monday Morning Jazz (using style names and definitions found in the allmusic.com web site) are post-bop, neo-bop/hard bop/bop, ballads/vocal jazz, and Brazilian.  Styles heard less often are cool/West Coast, modal, soul/groove/funk, mainstream/swing, traditional and Afro-Cuban.  Styles heard rarely or not at all are avant garde/free jazz, fusion/acid jazz, so-called “smooth” jazz, and any other styles not heard here.

        A key characteristic of the show is variety.  Each set includes a mix of different types of music and types of groups.  I try to keep a constant mix throughout the three hours of piano trios, quartets, combos, and vocals.  In my nearly five years of hosting the show I have taken advantage of our large library by playing over 400 different combos, over 200 different piano trios, over 150 different singers, etc.  Thus, listeners are exposed to new and old seldom-heard artists as we4ll as the most famous.

Hosting the show is a real pleasure and, as the jazz hosts tell each other, the only way I’ll ever leave is feet first.

 

Summer:  Attempt at publicity committee using listeners.  Cart on air.

Fall publicity committee consists of Kris Powell, Kevin Lampkins, Colin Tipton, Susan Mullis, John Ramsey, Chris Heerema.

 

          Keith Barrett’s recent cart announcements soliciting listeners to participate in the station’s Classical Department have paid off quite well. Close to a dozen listeners responded and attended an introductory meeting on June 5.  All of them have been accepted into the station’s membership training program, with training sessions scheduled for Tuesday and Wednesday evenings for the next three weeks.  Keith Barrett and Dave Nagel will conduct the sessions.

          One of the goals of this special volunteer recruitment drive is to prepare a new group of volunteers so that they will be prepared to do classical shows as the need arises.  This is particularly important, as we have no one ready and willing to do classical fill-ins other than the regular on-air staff. One of the new trainees may be recruited to cover the Wednesday classical slot.

          Historically one of the station’s most important attributes has been the stations commitment to building a comprehensive collection of records and CDs.  The idea of “weeding” the library is against the very principals of the station was founded on, and the ECOM will do whatever is necessary to ensure that adequate space if provided for the collection in the years ahead.

 

Advocate meeting re publicity.

 

MUSIC

CDs received by Genre during the one year period 1/1/02-12/1/02:  Rock-1908, Jazz-718, Folk/BG-798, Urban-94, Ambient-221, World/Reggae-165, Blues-116, Soundtracks-5, for a total of 4020.

 

MARATHON

          Marathon took place in late winter, and it netted the highest amount of pledges ever: $79,000 pledged from 1643 listeners.  When the books were closed on the event five months later, a total of $75,512 was collected!

          pledging $80,000 to Marathon 2002!  That’s 10k over the goal of $70,000!  Thanks to Susan Mullis, our Director of Development, and volunteers Kevin Lynch and Andy Taylor, The t shirt was purple with a kite designed by Kevin Markowski.

          Fall Fund Drive 02  Goal 20k netted 47k.  $50 denim shirt offered for the first time.

          Third week in November major ice storm.  Station transmitter site on generator for almost four days!

FALL

Fall Fund Drive 02 Oct 27    Goal 20k netted 47k.  $50 denim shirt offered for the first time. Fall fund drive which was held in November had a $20,000 goal, but by the end of the week over $48,000 was pledged!  Shirt offered.  $38,820 collected.

         

Susan reports that we are planning to have another wonderful premium for the Fall Fund Drive: a denim shirt with the same logo we used on the hat embroidered over the pocket. Susan thinks that this will be well received by our listeners.

 

 

Development

          Publicity Form

          Special Fall Student Guide aimed at students.

Staff Development

 

          Classical Training

          Need Membership Director

          Staff Recognition: 

                             Genre Directors, see me

Special copy of the guide.

Listener Line 799 calls in one month!.

 

Guide, future of?

Publicity Report

          Stickers

          Key Chains

         

Music Dept

Budget:  Genre Purchases $500 now/500 later.

          Must make effort to find best price.  Go through Purchasing System.

 

 

ECOM

 

At Large Member vote – Steve Theaker

          Steve Theaker stepped down after close to a year as At Large member.   

With the help of the station’s volunteer staff, the ECOM has been working over the last couple of months identifying key station areas in need of improvement or areas where a little bit of attention would result in substantial growth. The first three areas that the ECOM will be working on this year are: Promotion, Staff Development and upgrading Music Department equipment and procedures.

The lack of station promotion was identified as a major concern and the ECOM has decided to tackle this issue first.  Some of the ideas in the planning stages include the formation of a Publicity Committee, utilizing station listeners as well as WWUH volunteers, producing a campus-only issue of the Fall Program Guide, “wrapped” with a special cover and including text and pictures to appeal to students in an effort to get them to listen to WWUH and make them aware of the volunteer opportunities at the station and making it easier for volunteers to promote their station activities through the use of pre-printed forms from which Press Releases will be generated.

          In the area of Staff Development, the ECOM has determined it would be very desirable that we have a Membership Director, someone who can coordinate our entire volunteer effort, including training, recruitment, staff recognition and the like.  Ideally this person would come from the existing staff.  If you are interested in learning more about this volunteer position, please contact John.

          In the area of the Music Department, which is already running quite smoothly, the goals are to get some help so that new releases can be put out more quickly, purchase and upgrade our computer equipment to make processing of new releases easier and the expansion of our Music Database and purchase of discography software.

 

2002 concerts:

          Our 2002 concert schedule included:  L’Shir, Nerisa & Katryna Nields*,  the American debut of Na Dorsa; Amy Gallatin and Stillwaters*; Mad Agnes*; Providence  on their 1st US Tour;  Nancy Tucker*; Jonathan Edwards*; Mark Erelli & Lynn Miles*; Tish Hinojosa*;  Kate Rusby;  Alison Krauss and Union Station*;  Eliza Gilkyson & Cliff Eberhardt*; Bill Morrissey with Liz Queleer*; James Keelaghan*; Cathie Ryan; Craobh Rua; Lunasain; Cheryl Wheeler*; Danu; Brooks Williams & Donna Martin*; Jack Hardy*; Lucy Kaplansky with Jennifer Kimball*; Jerree Small, Maria Sangiola and Guy Grande*; Craobh Rua; Dervish; Lunasa;  Cheryl Wheeler*; Danu; Aztec Two Step*; Brooks Williams & Donna Martin*. The shows marked with “*” we cosponsored with Music for a Change.

 

ENGINEERING 2002

New CD recorder in Production.

Engineering Projects:

Painting and Carpet

Workstation

          Auxiliary transmitter failure.

          CD Recorder in the air studio

          Duplicator in Air temporarily.

          Phone delay in production.

          New Generator

Pending:

New mail slots, computer area and area for the dubber.

Computers for Air and Production

Walkway

84 web streams

The Connecticut Legislature adopted the Amber Plan into the state’s Emergency Alerting System guidelines.  This system is used to notify the public of a missing child.

The lease that we have with WTIC for use of their tower on Avon Mountain will expire in a couple of years, and the Engineering Department is exploring options in case the terms of the renewal are not desirable.

We are in the early stages of planning the renovation of the Air Studio, to take place sometime in the next couple of years.  The renovation would allow us to incorporate a digital audio board, enhance the ergonomics of the studio and give us greater capabilities and flexibilities.  Staff input is requested.

The ECOM has been discussing expansion of WWUH in the area of Information Technology, to include things such as facilitating better staff access to computers, improving station database content and usefulness, installation of additional digital audio workstations (DAWs), expansion of WWUH.Org, etc.

Some of the ideas being tossed around include:

          The installation of the computers already on order for the Air Studio and Production Studio as soon as possible after they are delivered.

The need to evaluate and specify security software and hardware to protect station IT assets from outside invasions.

The formulation of a multi-year plan for the expansion of IT technology at WWUH.

Determination of the feasibility of having a printer connected to the air computer and whether or not we can make drives available for staff access.

          Discuss desirability and options for compiling playlists on the PC and perhaps uploading them to the station’s web page.

          Creation of a database on the office computer with complete staff info including pictures to help with staff development.

Design and implement a network to connect all station PCs (except possibly the production workstation).

Discuss options on how listeners will be able to access the DJ on the air. Some volunteers are not interested in this, and do not want email addresses and have said that they don’t want to be bothered with on line questions. Others have expressed excitement about these ideas.  Since we don't want listener’s queries to be ignored, we'll have to look at options. Can we have the web page change by time of day and day of the week so that a button saying "contact announcer" appears only when those shows who's hosts have agreed to participate on line are scheduled to be on the air? What other options exist to allow listeners to interact with the hosts who want such input but not with the others who don't? There is also the problem of announcers being distracted or even preoccupied by on line questions, to the detriment of their on-air presentations.

          On April 25, WWUH sponsored a meeting of the local chapter of the Society of Broadcast Engineers at the University of Hartford’s Gray Conference Center. The meeting featured a presentation by a representative of Ibiquity, the company that is spearheading digital FM radio using a system called In-Band, On-Channel or “IBOC”, (pronounced “eye-bock”).

IBOC is a system that can be used by FM radio stations to transmit a high quality, digital audio signal along with their analog signal, all on the station’s existing frequency. The proponents of the system claim that IBOC-FM will provide CD quality audio to the listening audience, significantly improve a station’s signal within its existing coverage area, and offer some other features as well, while at the same time allowing listeners to continue to listen to the analog signal with their existing radios.

 

 

 

 

MISC

          Select comments from the Listener Line:

I am in Hawaii and i listened to your station for the first time over the net. very cool very cool....

kristie in Hawaii

          “I want to let you know how much I appreciate your radio station!  I think UH radio is the only one, including NPR, that is giving us accurate information about our government and about what is going on in the world.  The programs are insightful and extremely important.  It’s crucial that we know the truth about what is going on, so that the everyday media, including NPR, doesn’t dupe us.  We get the in-depth story from WWUH, which is absolutely the most important station on the air.  Thanks for the wonderful music, fantastic commentary, and for programming that is enlightening and informational.  Thank you very much” 

 

WAPJ in Torrington increased the number of WWUH rebroadcast hours to 90 per week.

Summer:  Attempt at publicity committee using listeners.  Cart on air.

         

           

 

 

May/June 2002 Program Guide:

          Third week in November major ice storm.  Station transmitter site on generator for almost four days!

          February 3, 2002: At Large Member vote – Steve Theaker       

 

 

Publicity

          Joan Holiday was interviewed by WTIC Radio News to discuss the death of Rocker Dede Ramone on June 6th.

          Station alum Kevin Shiveley appeared on the NBC Nightly News with Tom Brokaw in late May in a segment on the Internet Copywrite issue.  Another WWUH alum, Nicole Godburn, appeared on similar segment on local NBC30.  Both Nicole and Keith work for “beethoven.com”, a classical webcaster located in Hartford.

The word was put out that we were looking for stories and recollections from current and former volunteers for inclusion in the WWUH History Document, and in 2002 a number of people sent in submissions.

-Harvey Jassem:

 “When I moved to Connecticut in 1977, I quickly found WWUH as a listener, and really liked the station and its variety. I was a regular listener, and was pleased that the station was affiliated with the University of Hartford were I too was affiliated.

“I did my first show in around 1980, sitting in with Marsha Lasker, playing "oldies" on her late night show. She was a student of mine who challenged me to do radio if I were going to teach about it. I recall bringing in some of my "oldies" and playing & discussing old rock. Shortly after that, I did an afternoon synthesis slot for a while. Then Rob Banks asked me to take a morning jazz slot, and that became something of a staple. I think I started that regular morning jazz (Weds. if I recall correctly) around 1982. I recall Rob and Bill Yousman hanging out in the background urging me to play the real edgy avant-garde stuff.

“In addition to the music that was given time on the station, what I really liked about WWUH was the people and their ethics. I remember, for example, a staff discussion about whether or not to announce concerts that were being held at a local venue, and whether or not to accept 'guest list' passes for that venue. The venue had a lot of good music that appealed to our staffers, but the staff decided that the bouncers in that place were far too rough and we should not cooperate with them anymore, even though that meant giving up the 'guest list' status. That was an ethical decision that cost station staff a nice benefit. I was proud to be a part of such a group of people.

“I continued doing morning Jazz until around 1987, when I left the area for nearly a year, then returned in 1988 to Monday morning jazz until around 1997 when I again left for about a year. Since then I have been filling in on jazz shows, playing a role in the Monday Night summer Bushnell Park jazz series, filling in for synthesis, and taking on the role of a regular for the Street corner Serenade since spring, 2001. Ironically, I'm playing some of the same records that I started with 20 years earlier.

The audience members have been fantastic over the years. They know the music, they want to know more. They've taught me a lot. They're appreciative and supportive. I enjoy every aspect of my association with WWUH. It is an honor to be associated with such a fine station. Every time I travel to another city, I listen to local radio. WWUH continues to be one of my favorites worldwide. It's amazing that it runs so well with a largely volunteer staff. It's a tribute to the mission that there are so few problems. We've had great leadership and members for the 25 years I've knows the station.

“One of my fears was when the station went from having a student GM to a professional GM. I thought the notion of student GMs was a good one that might encourage students to come to and stay with the station, as they saw themselves possibly running for the position of GM. I thought the turnover would also keep the station fresh. While there is a part of me that continues to believe that, I am quite certain that the station could not have had a better GM than John Ramsey all of these years. He is fair and dedicated and gets a lot of fine work from the volunteers. I like and respect his values and his style. The station would not sound as good as it does without his leadership as GM, both technically and in terms of content.

          Another recollection came from Charlie Horwitz, Class of '72:

“Once Ken Kalish realized that his motley crew of announcers really did want to do radio round the clock, he set out to make it happen. A brave move for anyone but especially for Ken since I'm not sure he even liked rock music. At the time, let's call it the summer of '70, Charlie Allen was our CE and I was PD. We also happened to be roommates with two other guys in a run down dump in some uncharted area of Hartford.

“So before the end of the school year, Ken gets funding to pay us for sticking around during the summer months and making sure the station was on the air and kept regular hours. He even made sure our cars were outfitted with FM radios so we'd always know what was going on at the station. Now that was a big perk cause in '70, Fm radios hadn't yet become standard equipment in cars. Several times, after coming home an crashing after doing an extended Blimp Works, I guess I let my enthusiasm slip and sometimes I just didn't care what the station was doing or who was doing it. But it was my job to jump out of bed and get over to the station any time someone didn't show up. Which seemed to happen with some regularity that first summer.

“Well as it turned out, Ken didn't make any friends with my roomies and when he called (and he did, any hour of the day or night), if they answered the phone, they'd hang up on him. Of course this was intolerable to Ken and he let me have it every time he got hold of me. So I pressed all my friends and plenty of strangers into service just to

keep Ken off my back. I remember my roommate and best friend Hank Bultman became Electric Aunt Jemima on the air. He got so into his show that he went out and bought the entire Dylan library. So he could play clean copies of all his favorites.

“I don't think I took my first management position too seriously but somehow we got through that long hot summer, had some fun and somehow managed to change WWUH forever. It wasn't long after expanding the program day that the Ecom felt justified in asking our listeners to financially support our efforts. We mimicked every bad PBS beg-a-thon plea and probably drove away more listeners then we ever had. Again, the idea stuck and became a lasting tradition.

“Please get Mr. (Charles) Allen to verify my stories to protect the innocent. I remember when I first started at the station seeing the News Station wagon. One of the news guys was Claude Schlotterer (spelling??). He looked like Bluto and had a gland condition that prevented any deodorant or antiperspirant from doing the slightest bit of good (OK - he stunk!).

“Those of us in the up and coming crew of announcers thought Claude's weight led to a prolonged state of disrepair of the wagon and that his lack of bodily hygiene prevented the car from having any resale value what so ever. Claude just seemed to disappear after that year - I hope] it was because he graduated but I don't really know.

          I think Stu Kaufman and John LaBella might remember more on this.

“Hope this helps fill in some gaps.”

 

Brian Grossjean recalled: When I began putting the station's world music collection together, I collected world music CD's and LP's from all over the station, including the folk, jazz and urban sections, in the office, and on the floor where no one knew where to file them.

          I got a regular Tuesday All Night show, then went to a few different Gothics, then did "The Global Village" from 1994 - 1996 Monday afternoons. I always got an excellent listener response from people newly discovering this music.  Then I did fill- ins until October 2000 when I took over the Sunday morning folk show from Bill Domler. I renamed it the Culture Cafe earlier this year. 

A woman called once to say that while listening to the Klezmer music, she had a real turnabout in her feelings toward her culture due to the music. It made her long for her faith and heritage. World music at WWUH was pretty much underserved when I arrived. Some folk shows played field recordings and some African and Scandinavian folk, Ambience played synthesized Native American, but no one was really giving the music any attention. In 1992, I began my shows, which were mostly World Music. On my first show, a guest from the show before me fell asleep in the studio, and I was nervous about him snoring on the air.

 

Harvey Jassem wrote:

One of my fears was when the station went from having a student GM to a professional GM. I thought the notion of student GMs was a good one that might encourage students to come to and stay with the station, as they saw themselves possibly running for the position of GM. I thought the turnover would also keep the station fresh. While there is a part of me that continues to believe that, I am quite certain that the station could not have had a better GM than John Ramsey all of these years. He is fair and dedicated and gets a lot of fine work from the volunteers. I like and respect his values and his style. the station would not sound as good as it does without his leadership as GM, both technically and in terms of content.

I continued doing morning Jazz until around 1987, when I left the area for nearly a year, then returned in 1988 to Monday morning jazz until around 1997 when I again left for about a year. Since then I have been filling in on jazz shows, playing a role in the Monday Night summer Bushnell Park jazz series, filling in for synthesis, and taking on the role of a regular for the Street corner Serenade since spring, 2001. Ironically, I'm playing some of the same records that I started with 20 years earlier.

In addition to the music that was given time on the station, what I really liked about WWUH was the people and their ethics. I remember, for example, a staff discussion about whether or not to announce concerts that were being held at a local venue, and whether or not to accept 'guest list' passes for that venue. The venue had a lot of good music that appealed to our staffers, but the staff decided that the bouncers in that place were far too rough and we should not cooperate with them anymore, even though that meant giving up the 'guest list' status. That was an ethical decision that cost station staff a nice benefit. I was proud to be a part of such a group of people.

 

My most memorable day on the air was the day the draft lottery numbers were announced. I remember playing long cuts so we could gather the info from the wire to read on the air. That was the year my kid brother was in the lottery... imagine how I felt when his birthday came up as number 8.... and I still had to be professional and read the rest of the dates. (He turned out to be professional and read the My most memorable day on the air was the day the draft lottery numbers were announced. I remember playing long cuts so we could gather the info from the wire to read on the air. That was the year my kid brother was in the lottery... imagine how I felt when his birthday came up as number 8.... and I still had to be professional and read the rest of the dates. ( he turned out to be 4-F from an old skiing injury, but that's another story for another. My most memorable day on the air was the day the draft lottery numbers were announced. I remember playing long cuts so we could gather the info from the wire to read on the air. That was the year my kid brother was in the  lottery... imagine how I felt when his birthday came up as number 8.... and I still had to be professional and read the rest of the dates. (he turned out to be 4-F from an old skiing injury, but that's another story for another  place).”

 

Ken gets funding to pay us for and making sure the station was

He even made sure our cars weres know what was going on at these in '70, Fm radios hadn't yetd Blimp Works, I guess I let my

ng home anidn't care what the station was job to jump out of bed and get

 

Well as it turned out, Ken didn't make any friends with my roomies and when he called (and he did, any hour of the day or night), if they answered the phone, they'd hang up on him. Of course this was intolerable to Ken and he let me have it every time he got hold of me. So I pressed all my friends and plenty of strangers into service just to stay on the air. He got so into his show

Dylan library. so he could play

I don't think I took my first management position too seriously but somehow we got through that long hot summer, had some fun and somehow managed to change WWUH forever. It wasn't long after expanding the program day that the Ecom felt justified in asking our listeners to financially support our efforts. We mimicked every bad PBS beg-a-thon plea and probably drove away more listeners then we ever had. Again, the idea stuck and became a lasting tradition.

Please get Mr. (Charles) Allen to verify my stories to protect the innocent. I remember when I first started at the station seeing the News Station wagon. One of the news guys was Claude Schlotterer (spelling??). He looked like Bluto and had a gland condition that prevented any deodorant or antiperspirant from doing the slightest bit of good (OK - he stunk!).

 

n, watching it being built and auditioned for a folk music show, t and never followed up. I was one more semester to go. As I o get assigned to WWUH for the al Day weekend 1971 working on y, all pre computer of course. s Ken Kalish who asked me if I g type of program. I said if I e said, great, you go on in 15 part board pretty quickly and und, I had a sense of what was any problems. SO off I go. My first song at ht by the Band. And except for forgetting to turn off the mic in it down) and taking off my r out when I wasn't, I did OK. I shared alone. It was the tamest a local group had recorded ant of sorts I think the station had done an

 

Well one night after my Gothic Blimp Works show, I was determined to incorporate that song into a PSA about Saving the Whales. I put in several hours to get 60 seconds of moderately coherent information and put the whole project to bed on a nice new cart. Leaving the Gengras Center just before dawn, I was struck by the sounds of whales whistling down the empty hallways. Now I know that it was just the wind whistling through the opened doors and not the voices of thankful whales but I all properly closed. So I went those voices and have felt very UH, with hosts from every genre were using the World Music racks

extensively.  promote "Peace through cultural

Anderson moved on to channel 30,""they were put there and no one she found was most people were 

While' an important part of the station ’'WWUH has always made a point of making concert announcements on the air, were required ray Center was being designed, At the station.  

Sure enough, n, talks were started with the B18darktHISTpwoer

 

 

No Its usually much colder here in the winter.

 

"An Englishman's notes on Six Months At WWUH

I've been here before you know. Well, by here I mean New England (and before anyone writes in, I apologize for calling places by the wrong names in this piece …it will happen!)

Boston, for instance, had always looked like an interesting place to start up a periodical on something like Lighthouse Haunting but I'm sure that it has been tried a thousand times before and so all of my little projects and shadowy schemes, (oh good this is already going the sub Dickensian route that I had hoped), they had come to nothing. ……until September 1995.

Now at that time long, long ago neither I, nor your Star DJ, had any inkling that fate would one day lead to me saving WWUH. ……but it would.

I was a peripheral part of David Bowie's Touring party at that time and one evening found myself by the gates of The Meadows Music Theatre awaiting some accreditation, when what seemed like an endless caravan of local important people swept by us with disdain and disregard. Well, not exactly. One of them gave us some tea. But anyway I did notice that the sound-check, for what was in fact the very first night of Bowie's World Tour, had attracted many more local important people than usual. Your STAR DJ, it now seems, was among this select but sizeable group of locals!

So me and my fellow scribes (we were writing Bowie's biography at the time) got our passes and that was that. It was a wonderful show and I didn't see any of these important local folks again.. Although Bowie later confided to me that he himself had never seen so many local important people at one of his sound-checks. That last bit was a lie. But you get my drift!

But the significant point here is that I liked your town very much and vowed to return soon.

New York City was about the closest I got for the next few years and it was there, a few days before Halloween in 2000, that I found myself at The Bottom Line with my friend Al Stewart. That night he had a new album out and I was selling it for him. Your Star DJ, it appears, was there and either bought one from us or else Al gave her a copy. We all had a fantastic evening but still we didn't notice one another. Now the charisma of an Englishman is so strong that competent speech with them is often a problem for young American women, I realize this, but she could of at least have introduced herself. However, she chose not to.

So fast-forward to June 2001 and my headlong date with destiny and WWUH is now fast approaching.

I was at The Mohegan Sun with Al, where he was performing a concert (because that is what he does) and your STAR DJ was there for the gambling and half price Margarita's. Another little lie. She had traveled there to interview Al for her WWUH radio show. Now at this moment in time we had no inkling that we had (nearly) met a few times before. The atmosphere in the dressing room was very relaxed and she got her interview with Al. I had meanwhile sat there throughout all of this, wondering how I could get her phone number because it was 'my job to get a copy of all Al interviews for our own protection………..' at least that was what I told her and she believed it! So your STAR DJ then gives me what turns out to be an incorrect e-mail address to contact her on at and flees to the welcoming arms of the nearby slot machines and all that half priced drink! She wasn't seen again for weeks by anyone.

To cut a long story short I did track her down in the end and we have been together in your Wonderful town ever since.

I love it here. I was told to bring sub Arctic thermals and nothing else but as far as I can see it has only gone below freezing three times since September! I eventually gave in and was forced to go to Banana Republic for spring style clothing the week before Xmas! It's all a little perplexing.

Of course by now Al Stewart had heard so much about WWUH from me that he made a special point of coming in to see for himself and did a rare 45 minute interview for the STAR DJ's show at the start of March. It was publicized on his website and as a result of this an extra 300 fans around the world heard it on the net. That's how I listen to it when I'm in England too. It comes across crystal clear and to my mind is one of the most brilliant bits about WWUH broadcasting.

Be you sat with your laptop in Prague or in the back of a Ford truck parked up for the night beside a Dairy Queen in Fargo you can tune in to this wonderful, diverse and splendid station on-line. Isn't that just amazing!

And through it all I myself have been lucky enough to see WWUH at work from the inside when the STAR DJ is there. The shows, The Marathons…. it's all pretty amazing. And it has been a pleasure and a privilege to watch. There is a genuine spirit here (and I've been to lots of radio stations. ……lots)

And John Ramsey is a King among men. Just the other day he offered me "any show on the station" for as long as I like but I have enough problems keeping my beloved company on her weekly show and can only marvel at how she keeps it all together. Drink helps, of course it does, but deep down she is a truly gifted broadcaster

          Her weekly show is followed by Evening Classics, hosted by the boy Justin. He can only be about twelve years old but his show, if you haven't caught it yet, is amazing. He comes from a family steeped in Classical Music and it shows. We love him very much.

In case you haven't managed to work it out yet your STAR DJ is Joan Holliday. Her wonderful show, 'THE HAPPY CLUB, is broadcast to a grateful world every Wednesday afternoon between 1 & 4. It's great.

 

          Musician Al Steward appeared on THE HAPPY CLUB on Wednesday, March 6, 2002. Al was there for about 45 minutes, having a relaxed chat with hostess Joan Holliday. His music was featured throughout the show.

 

Kevin Lampkins

          It is the essence of all that WWUH stands for, wrapped up into one neat 3-hour weekly package. It is one of the most unpredictable shows on the air. It is a direct assault on the mainstream commercial radio that pollutes 80% of the airwaves. It challenges the listeners to think of music the way it was meant to be thought of: as an art form in addition to entertainment. Anti-Radio is free form radio for freethinking people. It’s independent radio for independent artists.

          The music you’ll find here is just about anything you can think of: rock, hip hop, jazz, blues, hardcore, psychedelic, folk, metal, fusion, punk, progressive, experimental and beyond. You won’t find any top 40 junk on here. The focus is instead on artists working to subvert the corporate, money-hungry, bottom line only music industry. There is a particular focus on the Hartford scene, as well as CT and the northeast. Local artists are encouraged to submit material to the show. I believe musical creativity should not be limited by commercial constraints. It should not have to conform to the cookie cutter flavor-of-the-week in order to be deserving of airplay.

On the show I always bring in various features, for instance, website reviews of independent bands, or reports from different music scenes across the area and country, or in-studio guest musicians or other experts dealing with independent music. With so many advancements in technology making it easier for musicians to create, record, distribute and market their own music, we’re poised for a real musical revolution where the few companies that own 90% of music in the world, are no longer relevant. My show is designed to fortify that revolution, three hours at a time. Every Wednesday from midnight to 3:00 am, is your chance to experience the music they don’t want you to hear. Don’t be left behind.

 

WWUH”s first engineer Robert Skinner submitted the following:

          When Clark, many others, and I put together WWUH, we needed all the helpwe could get.
          A number of professionals provided much-needed counseling.  WTIC provided a transmitter.  The regents scraped together $23,000 to fund the physical plant.  A local automobile dealer provided a station wagon.  We took the fine art of scrounging to new heights.
          The University was still physically spread out across Hartford at the time, and the components were a loose amalgam of liberal arts, business,
and technical schools.  There was little distinction drawn between "on
campus" students and those who might be thinking of taking a course at the Ward School of Electronics.  There was little if any distinction between town and gown.  Everyone wore a construction hat.
          On campus, work study provided some support.  There were a few coursesthat loosely related to broadcasting, but we thrived on
"interdisciplinary special projects."
          If you walked in the door, you had a job.  Many never went on air.  Some were supportive and welcome groupies.  Many never saw a penny for their efforts.  But you had to really piss people off to be shown the door.
The credo was "From each according to their ambitions and abilities, and to each according to their neuroses and needs."  Sounds "communist" but it got the job done.
          I am surprised that some department or another within UH has not taken broadcasting under their wing in the subsequent 35 years.  But I note that the station is still on the air -- with or without the gowns...
          Please tell the current 40 or so staff, whatever their origins and
orientations, that I admire and applaud their efforts.  Keep up the good work!
 

 

3 am sunday morning show

If you are like most people, you are probably asleep between the hours of 3 and 6 A.M. on Sunday mornings, but that is because you don't know what you are missing!         

We here at "Sit Down Please" offer a stimulating alternative to unconsciousness every week at that time. We invite you to sit in your favorite chair and gaze into the night sky until sunrise while listening to the best progressive music you've ever heard. Imaginative music performed by some of the most talented musicians you'll find on this or any other planet, leading you on one cosmic journey after another; taking your brain to places its only been while you're asleep and can't remember. But don't take our word for it. Get a little rest, have a cup of coffee and some Ginseng and sink comfortably into your chair. You won't regret it!

News events in 2002

Former Yugoslav leader Slobodan Milosevic’s trial on charges of crimes against humanity opens at The Hague (Feb. 12); U.S. and Afghan troops launch Operation Anaconda against remaining al-Qaeda and Taliban fighters in Afghanistan (March 2). International Criminal Court wins UN ratification; U.S. refuses to ratify (April 11); U.S. and Russia reach landmark arms agreement to cut both countries' nuclear arsenals by up to two-thirds over the next 10 years (May 13); North Korea admits to developing nuclear arms in defiance of treaty (Oct. 16); Kenneth L. Lay, chairman of bankrupt energy trader Enron, resigns; company under federal investigation for hiding debt and misrepresenting earnings (Jan. 24).

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